The Red Red Rose

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The best we can do is to keep thinking and writing about books, relentlessly and endlessly, as much as we possibly can.


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  2. The Gingerpotamus and the Incredibly Long Scarf;
  3. Fiscal Policy Rules (International Monetary Fund Occasional Paper).
  4. The Road to Socialism: A Choice Between Capitalism and Socialism;
  5. A Long Walk.
  6. Wings of Promise.
  7. Wings of Promise (Alaskan Skies Book #2): A Novel - Bonnie Leon - Google Books.

For the current list, see Read in The books that I choose to spotlight in blog posts are books I liked enough to recommend to other readers. Here are a six books one fiction, five nonfiction that I enjoyed recently, with appropriately positive reviews. The Island of Sea Women by Lisa See The best part of this book was learning about a culture that I had no idea even existed — the lives of haenyeo female divers who can hold their breath for up to three minutes and earn their living by harvesting animals and plants from the ocean and their matrifocal community of Jeju Island, off the coast of South Korea.

This well-researched account personalizes history by focusing on two soldiers — a Japanese medic named Paul Tatsuguchi, educated in America and drafted into the Imperial Army, and an American coal mine, Dick Laird who killed him — and found his diary. Versions of the diary were distributed to American soldiers. Many questions are left unanswered at the end of this book, which I suppose is inevitable because this is real history, not historical fiction; still, I felt the author could have spent more time addressing some of the moral controversy raised by the diary.

Each one is more heartbreaking — and yet more inspiring — than the last. Born blind in Vietnam, Julie Yip-Williams barely survived childhood; her family tried to euthanize her because of her disability. Her book, based on a blog she started when she was diagnosed with cancer, is a beautifully written account of a life well lived. This is going to be my go-to gift for all the new grandmothers in my life. The book must of necessity be put into a bookcase.


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  • And the bookcase must be housed. And the house must be kept. And the library must be dusted, must be arranged, must be catalogued. What a vista of toil, yet not unhappy toil!

    Wings of Promise (Alaskan Skies Book #2): A Novel

    William Gladstone. Sorting through books can be fun, sorting through clothes is never fun. I had totally run out of shelf space and had to make some tough decisions. At the end of my cleaning project, I had two shelves of books I want to read, plus a basket full of books I have to read for upcoming discussions. I slid it into the Little Free Library around the corner, hoping someone would give it a good home. Reichl, who was the restaurant critic for the New York Times when Conde Nast approached her to run the magazine, initially turned down the job, citing her lack of editorial experience.

    But she finally decided to take a chance, spending ten exhilarating years at the helm of Gourmet. He brings to life the perpetrators, victims, and their families, demonstrating their shared humanity and the twists of fate that can shape one person into a killer and another into a victim.

    In the two earlier books, Wish You Were Here and Emily, Alone , we meet Henry only in retrospect — he has died and his grieving family is trying to move on without him. In this lovely, quiet novel, we see Henry and his family through his own eyes. Short, well-titled chapters alternate between the present, when Henry is 75, and the past, starting with his childhood and moving through his service In World War II and his adult years.

    The novel brims with affection for its main character, an ordinary man wrestling with big questions: What is the meaning of an individual life? What do we leave behind? But there are exceptions to every rule, and The Dreamers is one of them. I just noticed that Emily St. John Mandel provided the cover blurb! This smart and original thriller, about a missing teenage girl, is also perfect for fans of true crime podcasts. For readers who noticed that A. Having lost a baby boy in infancy, the Hovdes relish their roles as hands-on grandparents.

    But when Shiloh joins a fundamentalist church that practices faith healing, and declares that little Isaac is a gifted healer, Lyle and Peg are faced with difficult decisions. This beautiful novel, covering a year of the changing Midwestern seasons, raises provocative questions about faith and family. Snow was falling, so much like stars filling the dark trees that one could easily imagine its reason for being was nothing more than prettiness. Mary Oliver. Happy ! Today, the snow is falling and my plans for the day have been canceled. Books that are hot off the press?

    Reward Yourself

    New in paperback? My favorites from ?

    Wings of Mentridar

    Over the past five years, the content has changed as well. Good-bye, in-depth book reviews; hello, collections of short reviews. The frequency of posts has slowed down as well. Once a month or so seems about right. I have a long list of post ideas, and I also have a huge pile of unread books.

    Most of the time, I choose to pick up a book rather than write a blog post. Here are a dozen terrific books I read recently when I could have been doing other things:. The library is a whispering post. The Library Book is one of my favorites of Susan Orlean brilliantly weaves all these strands, and more, together to create a fascinating narrative that celebrates public libraries.

    Wings of Promise (Alaskan Skies Book #2): A Novel - Bonnie Leon - Google книги

    When, and why, did we become so anxious to protect our children from every possible form of danger, no matter how statistically unlikely it is to occur, and why are we so quick to blame parents — particularly mothers — when something goes wrong? This engaging and thought-provoking book — part memoir, part sociological study — will inspire lively discussion. The shorter your sleep, the shorter your life. The leading causes of disease and death in developed nations—diseases that are crippling health-care systems, such as heart disease, obesity, dementia, diabetes, and cancer—all have recognized causal links to a lack of sleep.

    Neuroscientist Matthew Walker director of the Sleep Lab at UC Berkeley presents, in an entertaining and conversational way, all the evidence that adequate sleep, especially the REM sleep in which we dream, is essential to good health. So why did I stay up too late reading this book? I will take absolutely no offense. On the contrary, I would be delighted. As fast-paced and readable as any thriller, this book will outrage you. When I was young, my language wore coats and shirts and trousers, neckties, bespoke shirts. In my lifetime as a writer I have cast off layer after layer of clothing in pursuit of nudity.

    As I write toward my nineties I shed my skin. I tell short anecdotes, I hazard an opinion, speculate, assume, and remember. Poet Donald Hall died at age 89, just weeks before his last book, a series of short essays, was published. Every superfluous word is stripped away and what is left is the pure force of life.

    I collected every fact I could, hoarding the sparse and faded glimpses into my past like bright, favorite toys. This may be all you can ever know, I was told. When she was expecting her first child, Nicole Chung decided to search for her birth family. What she learned shocked her and went far beyond the medical history she had hoped to find. Chung not only tells a riveting and suspenseful story, she explores transracial adoption and biological heritage. No one would believe me. I mean, really believe me. The would get that look and nod.

    They would ask certain questions that suggested I was somehow culpable or that I was making most of it up out of nothing — just girlish fantasies and daydreams.